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Impact: November 25 Weekly Round-up on Uber Data-breach.

Updated Weekly Round-up on Uber Data Breach.

CyberWisdom Safe Harbor Commentary:

The Hacker News reflects the latest news of the latest high-profile data breach from Uber paying 20-Year-Old Florida Hacker $100,000 to keep their Data Breach secret. The secret was disclosed that in 2016, hackers stole information on 57 million drivers and riders, including names, email addresses, phone numbers and driver license data.

Uber Paid 20-Year-Old Florida Hacker $100,000 to Keep Data Breach Secret

https://thehackernews.com/2017/12/uber-hacker.htmlLast year, Uber received an email from an anonymous person demanding money in exchange for the stolen user database. It turns out that a 20-year-old Florida man, with the help of another, breached Uber’s system last year and was paid a huge amount by the company to destroy the data and keep the incident secret. Just last week, Uber announced that a massive data breach in October 2016 exposed… Uber Paid 20-Year-Old Florida Hacker $100,000 to Keep Data Breach Secret

 

Week of November 25 round-up…

CyberWisdom Commentary: The Hill reflects the latest news of the latest high-profile data breach from Uber, which disclosed that in 2016, hackers stole information on 57 million drivers and riders, including names, email addresses, phone numbers and driver license data, and that this breach was not only kept secret, but that the company paid the hackers a $100,00.  The breach may not be as big as Equifax or yahoo, but there need to have some regular framework to protect our data, sensitive financial information that expose us to identity theft and further scams and fraud robbing us blind in this high-profile data breach case from Uber paying 20-Year-Old Florida Hacker $100,000 to keep their Data Breach secret.Read on…

This week, we heard news of the latest high-profile data breach from Uber, which disclosed that in 2016, hackers stole information on 57 million drivers and riders, including names, email addresses, phone numbers and driver license data, and that this breach was not only kept secret, but that the company paid the hackers a $100,000 ransom to keep quiet. The company did fire its top executives in response and is now working with a former National Security Agency lawyer and a security firm to investigate, but in many ways the damage is done. According to Security Magazine, every 39 seconds, there is an attack on a computer with internet access and Cybersecurity Ventures predicts that a business will fall victim to a ransomware attack every 14 seconds by 2019. Engaging post, Read More…

thumbnail courtesy of thehill.com

 

CyberWisdom Commentary: This NBC article below shows that even though Uber paid the hacker $100,000 to delete the stolen data and covered the trail up for more than a year ago and now Uber had been exposed, we never are too sure that the hacker network and computer had been wiped clean or their computer had been hacked by other hackers and be on Safe harbor on cyber as well. Read on for further detail…

Can Uber trust the hackers who deleted the stolen data? Experts weigh in.

A must read story from nbcnews.com concludes a hidden

In Oct. 2016, after learning of the breach, Uber’s team tracked down the hackers and paid them to destroy the data, which included names, phone numbers, and email addresses for 50 million riders globally and 7 million drivers in the United States. Of those drivers, 600,000 also had their driver’s license numbers exposed. An Uber spokesperson declined to comment on why the company was confident the personal records were destroyed, but the New York Times reported that as part of the deal, the hackers agreed to sign non-disclosure agreements. Can Uber trust the hackers who deleted the stolen data? Experts weigh in.

thumbnail courtesy of nbcnews.com