google-site-verification: google30a059f9a075f398.html

Lesson learned from Google study finding: average, 9 million logins are stolen every 24 hours

CyberWisdom Lesson learned from Google study finding: average, 9 million logins are stolen every 24 hours

The original curated post is from Safe Harbor on Cyber.com securityboulevard.com

The Google search giant’s findings are astounding and instructive study. From March 2016 to February 2017, Google found 12 million usernames and passwords were successfully phished and 3.3 billion were stolen for data breaches. This means that on average, 9 million logins are stolen every 24 hours.The stolen password enters the dark network in two main ways: one at a time, through phishing attacks, or through data breaches, such as Yahoo and Uber.

Now consider the scenario of online retailing: How many times have you been shopping online and getting confirmation from Gmail? What data will be exposed?

This is not only the retail business bear the brunt. Many people, including employees, continue to re-use usernames and passwords on many websites and re-use private security answer with our own personal information as answers. It may be time for employers to forbid employees to use the secured passcode and answers for their corporate email account or to use workplace email as a secondary verification of their personal accounts.

The leap from a user’s personal Gmail account to a workplace account has created a new level of success called “Whale Phishing.”

E-mail contains key strategic information, and it is time for vendors to give them the security they deserve.

Read more…

Google should be applauded for spending a year studying how cybercriminals highjack account login credentials and expose them in the cyberspace. The search giant’s findings are astounding and instructive. Stolen passwords get channeled into the dark web in two main ways: one at a time, via phishing campaigns, or en masse, via data breaches.

Now think about the online retail implications: how many times have you been shopping online and getting confirmations via Gmail? What data does that expose?

read more at securityboulevard.com