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Identify Suspicious Activity for Identity Theft

Detect ID theft: Identify suspicious activity

The best way to detect identity theft is to monthly monitor your account and bank statements and regularly check your credit report.

What is the sign of identity theft?
How do you know if your identity is stolen?
What personal information should I regularly monitor?
How do I get my free annual credit report?
Should I use credit monitoring service?

What is the sign of identity theft?

Stay alert for signs of identity theft, such as:

  • You do not have an account to open an account, the debt on your account is unexplained.
  • Fraudulent or inaccurate credit report data, as well as your social security number, address, name and name, and account and personal data such as your employer.
  • Did not receive the bill or email. If your bill does not arrive on time, follow up creditors. Lost bills can mean identity theft and may have taken your account and changed your billing address to hide his tracks.
  • Accept the credit card you did not apply at all.
  • Be denied credit, or be offered unfavorable credit terms. For example, higher interest rates, no apparent reason or a higher down payment or fees
  • Receive phone or mail from debt collectors or businesses about goods or services you did not buy.

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How do you know if your identity is stolen?

Unfortunately, many consumers find their identity stolen after some damage has been done.

  • You may find out when companies have contacted you and you’ve never had debt.
  • You may find out when you apply for a mortgage or car loan and understand that the problem with your credit history is the loan.
  • You may find out when you receive an email about an apartment you’ve never rented, a house you’ve never bought, or a job you’ve never had before.

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What personal information should I regularly monitor?

 

Early detection of potential identity theft can have a significant impact. Through routine monitoring, pay attention to any suspicious activity:

Your financial statements. Monitor your financial accounts and billing statements on a regular basis, keeping an eye on the costs you did not receive.

Your credit report. The credit report contains information about you, including what accounts you have and how to pay your bills. The law requires each major national consumer reporting agency to provide you with a free credit report based on your request, once every 12 months. If an identity thief opens a credit account in your name, these accounts may appear on your credit report. To learn more, order a copy of your credit report.

Once you get your report, review it carefully. View inquiries from companies you have not yet contacted, accounts you did not open, and account debts you can not explain. Check for information such as Social Security number, address, name or acronym, and employer’s correctness. If you find fraudulent or inaccurate information, please delete it. See how to correct fraudulent information in a credit report. Continue to regularly check your credit report, especially in the first year after you discover that your identity has been stolen, to ensure that no new fraud occurs.

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How do I get my free annual credit report?

The amendment to the Federal Fair Credit Reporting Act requires each major national consumer reporting company to provide you with a free copy of your credit report at your request, once every 12 months.

To order a free annual report from one or all national consumer reporting companies, visit www.annualcreditreport.com, call toll-free at 877-322-8228, or fill in an annual credit report application form and mail it to: Annual Credit Report Request Services, Procurement Order Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281. You can print the form from ftc.gov/credit. Do not contact the three nationwide consumer reporting companies separately; they provide a free annual credit report only through www.annualcreditreport.com, 877-322-8228 and the annual credit reporting request service P.O. Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281.

Under federal law, you also have the right to a free report if the company takes adverse action against you, such as rejecting your credit, insurance or employment application, and you request a report within 60 days of receiving the action notice. Notification will provide the name, address and phone number of the consumer reporting company that provided your information. If you are unemployed and plan to find a job within 60 days, you also have the right to a free report for one year; you have a benefit or your report is inaccurate due to fraud. Otherwise, the consumer reporting company may charge you a copy of any other report of $ 9.50.

To purchase a copy of your report, please contact:

Equifax: 800-685-1111; www.equifax.com

Experian: 888-EXPERIAN (888-397-3742);

TransUnion: 800-916-8800; www.transunion.com

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Should I use credit monitoring service?

There are a variety of business services, fees, activities that will monitor your credit report and remind you to change your account. The price and service vary greatly. Many services monitor only one of the top three consumer reporting companies. If you are considering registering for a service, make sure you understand the information you received before you purchased it. Also check with your local Business Improvement Agency, consumer protection agency, and state attorney general to see if you have any complaints.

DETER ID Theft: Minimize your risk

DETER: Minimize risk

While there is nothing you can do to ensure that you will not be the victim of identity theft, you can minimize your risk and minimize losses as they arise, making it more difficult for thieves to access your personal information.

Protect Your Social Security Number Be cautious about spam and mail Be cautious when using the internet Choose complex passwords Verify information before sharing information Protect your wallet and wallet Store information in a secure location What is a credit freeze? About identity theft insurance

Protect your social security number

Do not put your social security card in your wallet or write your social security number on the check. Give your social security number only when absolutely necessary and require the use of other types of identifiers. If your state uses your social security number as your driver’s license number, you will be required to replace it with another number. Please do if your health insurance company uses your social security number as your policy number.

Your employer and the financial institution will need your social security number for salary and tax reporting purposes. If you are applying for a loan, renting an apartment, or registering for a public facility, other businesses may require you to provide a Social Security number for a credit check. Sometimes, however, they just want your social security number to save a normal record. If someone asks for your Social Security number, would you like to ask:

  • Why do you need my social security number?
  • How will my social security number be used?
  • How do you protect my social security number from being stolen?
  • What happens if I do not give you my social security number?

If you do not provide your Social Security number, some businesses may not offer you the services or benefits you want. Getting answers to these questions will help you decide if you want to share your social security number with your business. Decided to share is yours.

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Handle your trash and mail with care

To prevent identity thieves from stealing your trash or recycling bins to obtain your personal information, always include your receipt, a copy of credit application, insurance form, doctor statement, check and bank statement, expired charge card you dropped, and credit Provide the email you received.

To opt out of receiving pre-mailed letters of credit, call 1-888-5-OPT-OUT (1-888-567-8688). Note: You will be asked to provide your social security number, and the consumer reporting company needs to match your file.

Store outbound mail that contains personally identifiable information in the post office cash box or at your local post office instead of in an unsecured mailbox. Quickly delete mail from your mailbox. If you plan to leave your home and cannot receive your mail, please contact the United States Postal Service at 1-800-275-8777 or request a leave of absence at www.usps.gov. The post office will mail it to your local post office until you can receive it or receive it.

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Be wary when using the Internet

The Internet can give you access to information, entertainment, financial offers and countless other services, but at the same time, it can make you vulnerable to an online fraud, identity thief and more. For practical tips to help you prevent cybercrime, protect your computer, and protect your personal information, visit www.OnGuardOnline.gov.

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Choose complex passwords

Put a password on your credit card, bank and phone account. Avoid using readily available information such as your maiden’s maiden name, date of birth, the last four digits or phone numbers of social security numbers, a series of consecutive numbers, or a single word that appears in the dictionary. The combination of letters, numbers, and special characters becomes the strongest password. When opening a new account, you may find that many businesses still claim your mother’s maiden name. Learn if passwords are available.

Verify the source before sharing the information

Do not send personal information over the phone, the internet, or the internet unless you have already made contact and are certain that you know who you are dealing with. Identity thieves are smart and may act as representatives of banks, Internet service providers (ISPs) and even government agencies to let people know about their Social Security numbers, their mother’s maiden name, their account number, and other identifying information.

Before sharing any personal information, confirm that you are dealing with a legitimate organization. Instead of cutting and pasting the organization’s website, enter the URL in the address bar. When many companies misuse the names, many companies issue scam alerts. Or call Customer Service using the phone number listed on your account statement or phone book.

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Protect your wallet and wallet

Always protect your wallet and wallet. Do not carry your social security number or card; keep it in a safe place. Only carry the identification information and credit card and debit card actually needed when going out.

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Store the information in a safe place

Keep your personal information safe in your home, especially if you have roommates, hire outside help, or work in your house. Only share your personal information with family members who have legitimate needs. Keep your wallet or purse in a safe place; the same applies to photocopies of administrative forms with sensitive personal information.

Ask your workplace or business, doctor’s office, or other information security program that collects your personally identifiable information. Find out who has access to your personal information and verify that it is safe to deal with. Ask these records for disposal procedures. Find out if your information will be shared with others. If so, ask how your information is kept confidential.

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What is a credit freeze?

Many states have laws that allow consumers to “freeze” their credit – in other words, to restrict consumers from accessing his or her credit report. If you freeze your credit, potential creditors and other third parties will not be able to get your credit report unless you temporarily freeze it. This means that an identity thief can not open a new account on your behalf. Freezing your credit will not affect your credit score, nor will it affect your receipt of a free annual credit report, or the purchase of a credit report or rating.

The law of credit freeze varies from state to state. In some states, anyone can freeze their credit profile, while in other states only an identity theft can work. The costs of placing, temporarily lifting, and canceling a credit freeze vary. Credit in many countries freezes for the victims of identity theft, while other consumers pay for it – usually $ 10. It is also important to know that these costs are for each credit reporting agency. If you want to freeze your credit, that means freezing the freeze with each of the three credit reporting agencies and then paying each credit reporting agency.

Who can access my credit report if I freeze credit?

If you freeze your credit, you will continue to receive your free annual credit report. Even after a credit freeze, you can purchase your credit report and credit score. Companies with whom you do business still have access to your credit reports, such as your mortgage, credit card or mobile phone company, just as those who work in these companies. The company will also be able to provide you with pre-screened credit. These are the credit quotes you received in the email, you did not apply. In addition, in some states, potential employers, insurance companies, landlords and other non-creditors can still get credit reports and freeze credit.

If I need to have someone check my credit report, can I temporarily lift the credit freeze?

If you want to apply for a loan or a credit card, or if you want others to access your credit report, and there are no exceptions to this credit freeze law, you need to temporarily cancel your credit hold.

You can do this by using a PIN code, and each credit bureau sends a PIN once you complete the credit freeze. In most states, you need to pay a fee to thaw the credit freeze. Most states allow four credit bureaus to freeze the credit freeze for three days. This may prevent you from getting “instant” credit, something that you might want to consider when you consider applying to freeze your credit.

If I need to have someone check my credit report, can I temporarily lift the credit freeze?

If you want to apply for a loan or a credit card, or if you want others to access your credit report, and there are no exceptions to this credit freeze law, you need to temporarily cancel your credit hold.

You can do this by using a PIN code, and each credit bureau sends a PIN once you complete the credit freeze. In most states, you need to pay a fee to thaw the credit freeze. Most states allow four credit bureaus to freeze the credit freeze for three days. This may prevent you from getting “instant” credit, something that you might want to consider when you consider applying to freeze your credit.

Credit freeze cannot do?

l though the freezing of credit may make it illegal for identity criminals to obtain new accounts on your behalf, this is not a response to any fraud or any fraudulent activity. This does not shield you, for example, existing credit cards or other accounts that you have stolen can still be used by these identity criminals. There are other new accounts, such as telephone, wireless and bank accounts, where these identity criminals may open an account without a credit check. In addition, some creditors may open an account without initially getting your credit report. Moreover, if the credit has been fraudulent after the freeze, the freeze itself will not be ready to stop. And a credit freeze may not protect you in these types of situations, which will keep you out of the vast majority of fraud involving new credit lines.

What is the difference between a credit freeze and a fraud alert?

Fraud alerts are another tool for those who have stolen identity cards or who may be suspected of being stolen. Even if a fraud alert occurs, your business may check your credit report. When you issue a 90-day initial fraud alert or an extended fraud alert, potential creditors need to contact you or verify your identity using the “reasonable policies and procedures” as the law dictates, and then in your name. However, the steps a potential creditor hopes to verify your identity may not constantly remind them that the applicant is not you.

On the other hand, a credit freeze will prevent potential creditors and other third parties from accessing your credit report unless you have been lifted or have established a relationship with the company. Some consumers use credit freeze because they feel they give more protection. Like the credit freeze, fraud alerts are mainly valid for new credit accounts opened in your name, but may not prevent the thief from using your existing account or opening a new account, such as a new phone or wireless account, where Credit is usually not checked. Moreover, fraud warnings may only be issued by those who have stolen ID cards or suspected of being stolen. In some states, anyone can freeze credit.

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About identity theft insurance

Although identity theft insurance does not deter identity theft, in some cases, identity theft can be minimized. Just like any product or service, be sure to understand what you get when you think about buying. The items to be considered include: (1) the coverage provided by the policy; (2) whether the wage loss is included (if so, whether there is a pay ceiling or a separate deductible); (3) allowances; (4) What may be excluded (for example, if the thief is a family member or if the thief makes an electronic withdrawal and transfer); (5) Does the policy provide a personal counselor to help you resolve identity theft; and (6) Your existing Homeowner’s policy already contains some coverage. Note that one of the major “costs” of identity theft is when you spend time clearing your name. Also note that many companies and law enforcement officials will only negotiate with you, not the insurance company representative. So, even if your policy gives you a personal advisor, that advisor can only guide you often, not your name. And, when you evaluate insurance products and services, you may want to consider signing insurance contracts with your local business improvement bureau, consumer protection agency, and state attorney general.